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Alastair Humphreys tells us how he chooses his adventures

Alastair Humphreys »

How do you choose your next adventure when there are so many options available?

Wizarding up ideas for adventures is one of my favourite things to do. I find it enjoyable, exciting, but also easy. If I was a specialist I would need to search for something higher, harder and faster within my niche every time I wanted a new challenge. But because I am a generalist, I make the next adventure more challenging by making it differently challenging to previous projects. It is an important part of keeping adventure fresh for me.

I am surprised how often people tell me that they really want to do an adventure but don’t know what to do. Hopefully this walk-through of the way I come up with ideas might get your own adventure cogs whirring…

  • Cycling round the world
  • The Marathon des Sables
  • The South Pole
  • The Arctic Ocean
  • Iceland
  • Rowing the Atlantic

Frances Mills » Why I’m running 5,000 miles around the coast of Britain solo

It has taken four winters so far, but wild beauty, nature and the kindness of strangers en route make this slow journey more than worthwhile.

Frances Mills, writing in The Guardian »

I hope to return to the trails soon: I have 2,000-odd miles still to go around Scotland, on the most isolated and challenging terrain. When the storms broke my tent by snapping its poles, as happened during Storm Fionn in January 2018, I was pretty annoyed. Not annoyed enough for it to get in the way of sleep, though. Sure that nothing too important had blown across the field, I stubbornly wrapped my crumpled tent around me and drifted off. It would take a week to get my tent repaired and in the meantime a few friends of friends reached out and offered me a tent to borrow, a couch to sleep on and a chance to stay in a community-owned bright blue converted bus that was parked in the chalk hills of the South Down national park. Before the day was out, I was sitting round a campfire chatting to new friends, something I would have missed had my tent been in one piece.

Video » “Her Way” — Overcoming Women Stereotypes In The Outdoors

From Solomon TV on YouTube »

“Her Way” illustrates how we all have the ability to be and achieve more if assumptions and stereotypes are ignored. the film tells the stories of three women who have chosen to ignore stereotypes as they chart unique life paths—a single mother and member of the first all-female firefighting team in South Africa; a Chinese-born structural engineer and trail runner in New Zealand; and a delivery nurse and mother of four with a love for America’s National Parks.

THE STARS OF “HER WAY” ARE:
Born in the small town of Beaufort West, South Africa, Vuyiseka Arendse began volunteering as a firefighter when she was 19. Now 26, the single mother and family breadwinner works for the NCC in Cape Town as a member of the Juliet Crew, the first-ever all-female firefighting team in the country, protecting local landmarks from wildfires in the Western Cape region.

Chinese-born Nancy Jiang moved with her family from Ma’an Shan to Auckland, New Zealand when she was five. She studied structural engineering and today is the only female engineer in her firm. Small in stature and needing to prove herself in the workplace, she found her release through a love of trail running in the mountains above Queenstown, despite having been told as a kid that “Chinese people do not run.”

A caregiver at heart, Melody Buck Forsyth is a mother of four and a delivery nurse. In 2015, she gave birth to her daughter, Ruby, who was born with Down Syndrome. Despite “sometimes getting looks on the trail” because she might not fit the hiker stereotype, the outdoors has served as an escape for Melody and her family, where they connect and decompress.

Credits
Directed by Caroline Brouckaert and Kirsten Gerber
Executive producers Loïc Bailliard, Sofia Ahnebrink, and Greg Fell
Produced by Kirsten Gerber
Edited by Andrew King and Caroline Brouckaert.

Video » The Unspeakable World

Words by Alan Watts // Music by Adi Goldstein

 

But you know, if you talk all the time,
You will never hear what anybody else has to say,
And therefore, all you’ll have to talk about is your own conversation
The same is true for people who think all the time.
That means, when I use the word ‘think, ‘ talking to yourself,
Subvocal conversation,
The constant chit-chat of symbols and
Images and talk and words inside your skull
Now, if you do that all the time,
You’ll find that you’ve nothing to think about except thinking,

Neal Moore’s 22-river canoe journey across America

Jeff Moag, writing in Adventure Journal »

Fourteen months ago in Astoria, Oregon, Neal Moore shoved off in his 16-foot Old Town canoe, bound for the Statue of Liberty, some two years and 7,500 miles ahead. The 49-year-old had come home after nearly 30 years abroad to rediscover America and share the stories of its people in a style of journalism all his own, “slow and low down from the view of a canoe.”

He’d charted a two-year journey on 22 major waterways through 22 states, but almost didn’t make it out of Oregon. He slipped across the state line in late March last year, just ahead of a shelter-in-place order that would have derailed his 22 Rivers project for a second time. (His first attempt in 2018 fell victim to historic high water and a nasty Cottonwood snag after 1,700 mostly upstream miles.)

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Three Capes Track Walk » Tasmania, Australia

The Three Capes Track features some of Tasmania’s best walks taking in breath taking sights of the highest sea cliffs in the Southern Hemisphere and the power of the Southern Ocean. It’s a multi-day walking adventure atop Australia’s highest sea cliffs in the Tasman National Park.

Emil and Liliana Schmid are featured on Autoevolution

Liliana Schmid and a their Toyota Land Cruiser FJ60 in Ushuaia

Liliana Schmid and a their 1982 Toyota Land Cruiser FJ60 in Ushuaia, Argentina

World record holders Emil and Liliana Schmid have been driving their 1982 Toyota Land Cruiser FJ60 around the world since 1984.

Elena Gorgan writing in Autoevolution »

As of 2017, they still hold the Guinness record for the longest driven journey in the world: 741,065 km (460,476 miles) across 186 countries. But they also hold records for the most miles done in a single car and the most countries visited in a single car.

More importantly, they have no plans of stopping. The Land Cruiser went through its third rejuvenation in March 2017 and, as you would imagine, hundreds of flat tires, dozens of shock absorbers and batteries, one engine mounting, and too many to count cosmetic scratches and dents. Emil hopes it will continue running until they decide – or have to – stop traveling.

Not that they’re planning to do so anytime soon. “Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the places that take your breath away,” Liliana once mused. “It’s little things that make it worthwhile – it’s a flower, it’s a bird, it’s a mountain.”

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