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Category: Antarctica 🇦🇶

A short video guide to Union Glacier Camp

Via Vimeo »

Union Glacier camp is a seasonal, remote field camp in West Antarctica. It is one of my favourite places in the world, due largely to the wonderful people that run and pass through the camp.

I have been lucky enough to work there several times, and this film is a very short guide to the camp and some of the people who work there.

For more information about the camp please visit – antarctic-logistics.com/camp/union-glacier-camp/

Jenny Davis skied 715 Miles across Antarctica completely alone—and that’s just one of her crazy adventures

Jenny Davis

Jenny Davis

Jenny Davis as told to Ellie Trice / Shape Magazine »

This passion took on a new life when I was diagnosed with a benign tumor in my abdomen five years ago. After a painful surgery and treatment, I made the decision—while still recovering in a hospital bed—to apply to run the Marathon de Sables, a 155.5-mile ultramarathon through the Sahara Desert, starting in Ouarzazate, Morocco. I moved to Morocco to train and live in a tent among other female athletes from around the world, and ended up being the 16th female to cross the finish line after five days.

Adventure to me is about being idle. That doesn’t mean you have to go on a huge expensive expedition—you can simply just set up camp in the wild close to home for the weekend. It’s about getting outdoors and disconnecting from the pressures of mundane life.

But I wasn’t going to give up. In November 2019, I strapped on my skis and made my second attempt. This time around, for the first 500 miles, I was skiing at world-record pace. Then an injury, one they call polar thigh, set in. (The motion of skiing into a headwind or tailwind can compress your legwear, and if there you don’t have enough insulation or any cold air gets trapped, you can suffer from polar thigh.) For me, it started as these small clusters of ulcers on my leg, which continued to get bigger and bigger over time.

Read the whole article »

More » Jenny Davis (web site)

Six rowers become the first to cross the infamous Drake Passage unassisted

Six men, rowed their 29-foot (9-meter) rowboat for 13 days, to become the first to cross the Drake Passage unassisted.

Amanda Lee Myers, Associated Press via Time »

Six men fought for 13 days to make history, becoming the first people to traverse the infamous Drake Passage with nothing other than sheer manpower.

They dodged icebergs, held their breaths as giant whales breached near their small boat and rode building-sized waves while rowing 24 hours a day toward Antarctica.

The team of men from four countries finished crossing the Drake Passage on Wednesday in just under two weeks after pushing off from the southern tip of South America.

Colin O’Brady has become the first person to ski solo and unaided across Antarctica

According to his website, Colin O’Brady has completed the first-ever solo, unsupported, unaided crossing of Antarctica. He has reportedly arrived at the Ross Ice Shelf on the Pacific Ocean.

Aaron Teasdale, writing for National Geographic:

Using solely his own muscle power, O’Brady skied 932 miles pulling a 300-pound sled over 54 frigid days across the coldest, windiest, most remote continent on Earth, crossing from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean via the South Pole. After a remarkable 80-mile continuous push over the last two days, almost five times his strenuous daily average, he emerged from the TransAntarctic Mountains onto the Ross Ice Shelf a little before 1 p.m. EST, December 26 and stamped his name into the annals of polar lore.

In the final week of this long and perilous journey, O’Brady and Louis Rudd, 49, the British Army captain attempting the same feat, had battled life-threatening wind chills and whiteout conditions. With their thinning bodies shrinking from the effort—Rudd estimates he’s lost five inches off his already trim waist—they charged for 13 hours a day into a frozen, swirling world of white. Visibility was often so bad they could not see the ground in front of them.

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16 year old Jade Hameister is breaking records in Antarctica

Jade Hameister, a 16 year old student from Melbourne, Australia, is breaking records in Antarctica. She just become the the youngest person to ski to the North Pole, Greenland Ice Shelf, and now The South Pole.

Nicole Precel, writing in The Age:

The teen arrived at the South Pole after a gruelling 37-day journey and is the youngest to complete the polar hat-trick but is also the first woman to set a new route through Kansas Glacier from the Amundsen Coast of Antarctica.

“The one (record) I think is really special is the first woman to set a new route to the South Pole, and that’s kind of the one that I keep bringing up, the rest of them I’m not really fussed,” she said.

The ‘rest of them’ includes, at age 14, becoming the youngest to ski to the North Pole from anywhere outside the last degree of latitude, resulting in her being awarded Australian Geographic Society’s Young Adventurer of the Year.

Additional information is available from National Geographic Australia.

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