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Category: Destination News (Page 1 of 35)

Crossing the USA by canoe ยป a 22-month 7,500-mile journey from coast to coast

Corey Kilgannon / NY Times ๐Ÿ”’ ยป

Mr. Moore began in the Columbia River in Oregon, crossed several northern states and traveled down to the Gulf Coast by last winter. By early 2021, he was headed back up to the Great Lakes and to New York State, where he followed the Erie Canal to the Hudson River and ultimately to the Statue of Liberty.

โ€œI wanted to see the country up close and personal at this interesting time, with the pandemic and all the political strife, to find out what it actually means to be American today,โ€ Mr. Moore said.

โ€œI felt like I followed that light shining all the way across the country,โ€ he said later. โ€œMy journey was one of illumination. So to finally see that beacon up close, that flame of liberty, after seeing it in so many people I met across this land, it was overwhelming.โ€

Traveling by river became metaphoric: Just as rivers connect towns and cities, Mr. Moore said, he began exploring connections between people often separated by race, class and political stripe.

Norway has some 300 soaring mountain staircases

(Source BBC / Credit: Morten Falch Sortland/Getty Images)

  • Preikestolen is among Norway’s most hiked trails, with 331,000 visitors reaching its exposed top in 2019.ย  Its stone stairway was built by Nepalese Sherpas.
  • Around 300 stone mountain stairways have been built in Norway over the past two decades.

Mike MacEacheran / BBC Travel ยป

In many ways, the location and the sublime views from Preikestolen, or Pulpit Rock, near Stavanger in south-west Norway are irrelevant, because what is important is the journey to get there. It is a hike up an expertly engineered and well-maintained stone staircase that is as much of a marvel as the finale itself.

There’s an ancient beauty to the stairway and it comes from the fact that Preikestolen โ€“ like nearly 300 other natural stone staircase projects in Norway purpose-built over the past two decades โ€“ has been crafted by teams of Sherpas from Nepalese communities living in the shadows of Mount Everest.

There was a time when Norway’s mountain paths would only see a handful of local visitors. But social media has changed all that, and over the past decade, the country has seen such a dramatic spike in overseas travellers keen to Instagram its viewpoints that something has had to give.

 

Video ยป Noor

The Noor is a short aerial film by Vadim Sherbakov, of the beautiful winter landscapes of frozen Baikal Lake in the Eastern Siberia region of Russia.

Noor (ะัƒัƒั€) is a Buryat word for lake, and Buryat is ethos people who have populated this area for many years, so it was appropriate to use their beautiful word for this short film.

Nowadays, the region the world’s largest pure water lake is popular with tourists.

Millican Dalton ยป The godfather of ultralight camping

Millican Dalton, Jean Brown and Mabel Barker having a brew-up in 1935. Photo Mabel Barker Collection

Millican Dalton, Jean Brown and Mabel Barker having a brew-up in 1935. Photo Mabel Barker Collection

Milican Dalton (Apr 20, 1867 โ€“ Feb 5, 1947) the British self-styled “Professor of Adventure”, was never motivated by adrenaline fuelled adventure, by speed, or by winning races. He lived in a cave in Englandโ€™s Lake District and led camping and climbing trips up the local mountains.

Jeff Moag, Adventure Journal ยป

He outfitted himself and his clients in lightweight gear he designed and sewed himself, specializing in tents made of tightly woven Egyptian cotton. In the rain the fibers would swell, tightening the weave and rendering the shelter water resistant, if not exactly dry. He sold handmade rucksacks, advertising them as โ€œhalf the weight and one-third the costโ€ of the Norwegian packs in vogue at the time.

Millican did most of his sewing in the winter, when not climbing trees or, weather permitting, skimming across icy ponds on handmade wooden skates or sliding through the forest on skisโ€”a skill he acquired in the Alps before the First World War. His handmade clothes were habitually left un-finished as frayed testimony that in Millicanโ€™s eyes, hemmed shorts should never stand in the way of a good ramble.

โ€ฆ

Millican didnโ€™t see any reason why Barker or other women shouldnโ€™t climb hard rock, or otherwise do as they pleased. That was only one of his unorthodox beliefs, all of which he espoused freely. He relished a good argument, and though he was sometimes called him the โ€œBorrowdale Hermitโ€ he was as sociable as he was opinionated. He welcomed visitors, occasionally leaving handwritten invitations to take tea with him at โ€œSinbadโ€™s Cave.โ€ Those who obliged would often be goaded into political discussions, which Millican pursued with gusto. He was a socialist and an outspoken pacifist who once wrote Winston Churchill during the height of the Blitz, demanding the Prime Minister make peace with the Germans. It seems the local air raid warden had climbed up to the cave to demand Millican douse his fire, infringing the Cavemanโ€™s liberty and provoking his ire.

More ยป

Wikipedia

A breathtaking video journey through The Lake District National Park

 

Filmed across two years in The Lake District National Park,ย Michael Lazenby‘s video takes you on a grand tour of the most breathtaking vistas and sights this stunning part of the world has to offer, including Derwentwater, Cat Bells, Blencathra, Buttermere, Ullswater, Helvellyn, Angle Tarn, Castlerigg Stone Circle, Grasmere, Windermere, Langdale, Pavey Ark, Harrison Stickle, Great Langdale, Striding Edge, Crinkle Crags, Bowfell, Wasdale, Scafell Pike, Loughrigg Tarn, Rydal Water, Whorneyside Force, Great Gable, Styhead Tarn, Swirral Edge, Catstycam, and The Scafells.

More ยปย 

Ursula Martin, a cancer survivor, returns home after a three-year-long trek through Europe

Ursula Martin (Source ยป Adventure Blog)

Ursula Martin (Source ยป Adventure Blog)

Thomas Board, Adventure Blog ยป

Ursula Martin has recently returned to her home country of Wales after a three-year-long trek through Europe. Her walk was a personal mission and a quest to raise awareness for ovarian cancer, which she was diagnosed with ten years ago.

Ursula found out about her diagnosis on another backpacking trip. She was due to walk back to Wales after she had finished kayaking the length of the River Danube, which passes through Germany to Romania. She made it to Bulgaria and was about to begin her walk when she received the troubling news.

Forced to return home early, her plans just got bigger. Despite her diagnosis, Ursula persisted with her passion for hiking and completed a 3,500-mile walk around her very own stomping ground of Wales.

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Read more about Ursulaโ€™s journey at: onewomanwalks.com

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