It's a one way ticket. Enjoy the ride!

Category: Expedition ๐Ÿš™ (Page 1 of 2)

Heather Lea has some tips for packing light on an extended motorcycle trip

Heather Lea, Expedition Portal ยป

For many reasons, soft bags are the way to go. They cinch down with less stuff, so, as youโ€™re rolling along, consuming food, you can make your bags smaller.

The lightweight traveler should always factor in bulk as well as weight. You may look at the cost of an ultra-light sleeping bag and think, โ€œI can put $400 of gas in my bike and ride through most of Central America for that price.โ€ The differenceโ€”and youโ€™ll feel it after the first sandy road in Bajaโ€”is youโ€™re getting a good-quality bag that weighs 19 ounces and packs down to the size of a football, instead of something that, although much cheaper, can weigh more than 5 pounds, and doesnโ€™t even fit in your panniers when rolled up.

Some true diehards out there can ride for a month with a tarp and a match, but thatโ€™s not for this Girl Scout.

  • Use Stuff Sacks for Everything
  • Spread the Weight
  • Ditch Some Comfort
  • Shrink Your Towel
  • Buy as You Go
  • Bring Dual-purpose Gear

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Two men from New Zealand plan first unsupported crossing of Antarctica

Gareth Andrews (left) and Richard Stephenson (Right)

Gareth Andrews (left) and Richard Stephenson (Right)

Devon Bolger, New Zealand Herald ยป

A New Zealand doctor and his brother-in-law are attempting something thatโ€™s never been achieved in Antarctica before โ€” the first unsupported crossing of the icy continent.

Richard Stephenson, 40, from Dunedin, and his brother-in-law Gareth Andrews will begin the 2600km journey with little more than a sled and some skis.

They are expecting it to take about 110 days and will start in November next year.

The pair will begin at the edge of the ice shelf and make their way across the continent, to the other ice shelf, by skiing while dragging their supplies in a sled.

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74-year old Rosie Swale Pope restarts her 8,500km run from England to Kathmandu

On June 25th, 2021, at 12 noon, the exuberant 74-year old Rosie Swale Pope restarted her 8,500km run from Brighton, England to Kathmandu, Nepal.

In July 2018, Rosieย  started her 8,500km run that would have taken her through 18 countries. But for pandemic, she was ordered to stop her run in Turkey.

Rosie has remained determined to reach Nepal, but instead of continuing on from Turkey, she has restarted from the UK and is taking a different route in an effort to reach Katmandu and raising funds for the “charity PHASE Worldwide who work with remote Nepalese communities.”

Rosie previously ran around the world from 2003 to 2008.

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The Polar Expeditions Classification Scheme, a new unified classification system

Following Colin Oโ€™Brady’s claim to have completed the first unsupported and unassisted crossing of Antarctica, the polar adventure world came together to point out the inaccuracies of the 33-year old Americanโ€™s highly publicised and inaccurate claims. They then set about to develop a standard of definitions relating to polar travel.

Ash Routen, Explorersweb ยป

So in the wake of the Oโ€™Brady saga, veteran polar guide Eric Philips, along with other senior members of the polar community, decided that standardization was overdue in the polar world. Over the past two years, they developed The Polar Expeditions Classification Scheme (PECS), which was launched earlier this week.

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Wade Davis argues exploration is a flawed notion and explorers need to shed their self-obsession

Wade Davis, writing in The Walrus ยป

The true and original explorers, men and women who actually went where no humans had been, were those who walked out of Africa some 65,000 years ago, embarking on a journey that, over 2,500 generations, roughly 40,000 years, carried the human spirit to every corner of the habitable world.

Since then, terrestrial exploration has rarely been divorced from power and conquest. Searching for a passage to the Indies, Jacques Cartier is said to have discovered the Saint Lawrence River in 1534, though the valley was clearly settled at the time, the waters offshore crowded with the Basque fleet, fishermen with no interest whatsoever in flaunting the location of their discoveries: a cod fishery that would feed Europe for three centuries.

History heralds Francisco de Orellana as the first to travel the length of the Amazon (1541), a journey documented by his companion and scribe, Gaspar de Carvajal, who wrote of fleets of native canoes and riverbanks dense with settlements, home to just some of the 10 million people then living in the basin. โ€ฆ

Read the whole essay at The Walrus ยป

Jenny Davis skied 715 Miles across Antarctica completely aloneโ€”and that’s just one of her crazy adventures

Jenny Davis

Jenny Davis

Jenny Davis as told to Ellie Trice / Shape Magazine ยป

This passion took on a new life when I was diagnosed with a benign tumor in my abdomen five years ago. After a painful surgery and treatment, I made the decisionโ€”while still recovering in a hospital bedโ€”to apply to run the Marathon de Sables, a 155.5-mile ultramarathon through the Sahara Desert, starting in Ouarzazate, Morocco. I moved to Morocco to train and live in a tent among other female athletes from around the world, and ended up being the 16th female to cross the finish line after five days.

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Adventure to me is about being idle. That doesnโ€™t mean you have to go on a huge expensive expeditionโ€”you can simply just set up camp in the wild close to home for the weekend. It’s about getting outdoors and disconnecting from the pressures of mundane life.

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But I wasn’t going to give up. In November 2019, I strapped on my skis and made my second attempt. This time around, for the first 500 miles, I was skiing at world-record pace. Then an injury, one they call polar thigh, set in. (The motion of skiing into a headwind or tailwind can compress your legwear, and if there you don’t have enough insulation or any cold air gets trapped, you can suffer from polar thigh.) For me, it started as these small clusters of ulcers on my leg, which continued to get bigger and bigger over time.

Read the whole article ยป

More ยป Jenny Davis (web site)

Oskar Speck, the man who paddled a kayak from Germany to Australia starting in 1932, and Sandy Robson, the woman who recreated the adventure some 80 years later

Justin Housman, writing in The Adventure Journal ยป

In a span of seven years, he paddled a series of 15-foot kayaks more than 30,000 miles from the Danube River in Europe to the tropical shores of far northern Australia. Even better, when he first set out, he was โ€œmerelyโ€ planning to paddle to Cyprus for work, with no intention of traveling by kayak to the other side of the world. But the paddling proved irresistible and Speck did not stop once he reached Cyprus.

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Speck was 25 years old when he set out on his incredible journey. He was an unemployed electrician living in Hamburg. Work was scarce and prospects were dim after the 1929 stock market crash ripped through Germany, so Speck decided to seek work in the copper mines of Cyprus. With no other means to get there, and as a proud member of a kayaking club since his youth, Speck decided to paddle his way to, hopefully, a job.

In May, 1932, Speck shoved off from banks of the Danube in a collapsible and very much not seaworthy 15-foot kayak, and began paddling south. He arrived in the Balkans several weeks later and, lulled to boredom by the languid waters of the Danube, Speck made for the Vardar River, where soon fierce rapids dashed his boat nearly to splinters. While awaiting repairs, winter set in and the Vardar froze over, locking Speck in place for months.

Read the whole article in The Adventure Journal ยป

In November 2016, Western Australian woman Sandy Robson (aged 48), recreated Speck’s adventure, completed in some 5 years, having visited 20 countries and paddled some 23,000 kilometres.

The GPS wars are here, or why you need to learn to use a compass

It is important to recognise how vulnerable our technology is and how over-dependent we have become to fragile systems, some of which was built during a more trusting era.

Many things we do today, and much of our economy, relies on global navigation satellite navigation and time keeping. Much of the western economy relies on the Global Positioning System (GPS), an aging, fragile, and vulnerable US military project. Turns out that it can be easily be jammed, hacked, and turned off. And has been. Sometimes unintentionally.

All this makes for a good argument to learn how to use an old-fashionedย compass and read a map. Continue reading

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