It's a one way ticket. Enjoy the ride!

Category: Kit & Clothing ๐Ÿงณ (Page 1 of 2)

Heather Lea has some tips for packing light on an extended motorcycle trip

Heather Lea, Expedition Portal ยป

For many reasons, soft bags are the way to go. They cinch down with less stuff, so, as youโ€™re rolling along, consuming food, you can make your bags smaller.

The lightweight traveler should always factor in bulk as well as weight. You may look at the cost of an ultra-light sleeping bag and think, โ€œI can put $400 of gas in my bike and ride through most of Central America for that price.โ€ The differenceโ€”and youโ€™ll feel it after the first sandy road in Bajaโ€”is youโ€™re getting a good-quality bag that weighs 19 ounces and packs down to the size of a football, instead of something that, although much cheaper, can weigh more than 5 pounds, and doesnโ€™t even fit in your panniers when rolled up.

Some true diehards out there can ride for a month with a tarp and a match, but thatโ€™s not for this Girl Scout.

  • Use Stuff Sacks for Everything
  • Spread the Weight
  • Ditch Some Comfort
  • Shrink Your Towel
  • Buy as You Go
  • Bring Dual-purpose Gear

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Google Maps tips for adventurers

Google has published tips on how adventurers might better use Google Maps ยป

Do you have the urge to take every fork in the road and leave no trail untraveled? On the road to adventure, Google Maps can help guide the way โ€” no matter where youโ€™re going.

  • ย Be prepared for all conditions: Thereโ€™s nothing like a surprise rain storm to dampen adventure. Use the new weather and air quality layers to your advantage. See current weather conditions and temperatures, or check the air quality better plan your fresh-air outings.
  • Donโ€™t miss your train or plane with Indoor Live View: Airports and train stations can feel like a maze. Starting this summer in Zurich and Tokyo, use AR cues to see where the nearest platform, gates, elevator and escalators are, as well as baggage claim, restrooms, and ATMs.
  • Pedal to your next adventure: Planning a hill climb or beach cruise ride? Check how flat or steep a route will be with biking directions. And if you donโ€™t have a two-wheel companion, you can access bike-sharing stations in more than 100 cities thanks to integrations with CitiBike, Lyft and Lime integrations.
  • Tabs are your new tick list :Use the tabs at the bottom of the app to keep track of your travel bucket list and find your next must-see destination! Check out the Updates tab to see trending, must-see spots from local experts and publishers โ€” so you can find the best things to do no matter where you are.
  • Remember where youโ€™ve been: From the new trailhead you found to the hidden campground you want to revisit, we love to use Saved Places to view all these spots in one place. Itโ€™s perfect for reminiscing and sharing recommendations with friends.

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Heads Up ยป Primus wants to keep your back country stove out of the landfill by sending you repair parts for free

Primus is offering to send users needed parts to repair their Primus stove, for free. They are doing their part to keep stoves out of landfills and to remind users that they can fix things when they break.

The past few decades have introduced a throw-away culture that was strongly influenced by consumerism and the thought that products should be disposable. With the current state of the environment, more people than ever have shown interest in sustainable brands/products and are interested in maintaining and repairing their belongings when they wear out. We never subscribed to this trend and have instead ensured the opportunity to service and maintain our stoves since 1892!

While human life expectancy has increased drastically the past 100 years, life expectancy of the products around us appear to decrease. We know that between 55% and 65% of greenhouse emissions come from the handling of material, resources and products from cradle to grave. By extending the life of our products, it has a substantial positive impact on the climate and environment.

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PIEPS and Black Diamond announce a product safety recall of the DSP avalanche transceiver beacons

PIEPS and Black Diamond have announced a voluntary product recall of their DSP avalanche transceivers.

Recently, PIEPS, the European producer of the avalanche safety device, and Black Diamond, its North American distributor, came under fire with concerns the DSP avalanche transceiver beacon could inadvertently switch from โ€œsendโ€ to โ€œsearchโ€ mode, rendering the device useless to the wearer should they be caught up in an avalanche.

From the PIEPS website ยป

PIEPS has conducted extensive evaluations of the safety and performance of the affected products, including internal and third-party testing. The results conclude that the products comply with international standards, are properly designed, and perform as intended.

Nevertheless, PIEPS has recently developed a hardcase carrying system to be used with the DSP PRO, DSP PRO ICE and DSP SPORT that the transceivers can only be used when set and locked in the โ€œsendโ€ position.

More information about the product safety recall program can be found at both the PIEPS and Black Diamond websites.

Both PIEPS and Black Diamond also announced the recalls on Instagram.

A guide to backpacking stoves

Something that I had to consider for my upcoming adventures is availability of fuel. I chose a multi-fuel stove over an alcohol or propane/butane stove as they offer me more flexibility.

In some areas of the world, denatured alcohol and ethanol are not available, at least not legally. And when you are in a foreign country, the last thing you want to do is disrespect the rules and regulations of that country.

The same thing applies to propane and butane. You might find yourself someplace that doesnโ€™t have your brand of butane canister. Plus Iโ€™m not crazy about carrying around pressurized fuels in non-refillable canisters that Iโ€™ll have to dump into a landfill.

The GPS wars are here, or why you need to learn to use a compass

It is important to recognise how vulnerable our technology is and how over-dependent we have become to fragile systems, some of which was built during a more trusting era.

Many things we do today, and much of our economy, relies on global navigation satellite navigation and time keeping. Much of the western economy relies on the Global Positioning System (GPS), an aging, fragile, and vulnerable US military project. Turns out that it can be easily be jammed, hacked, and turned off. And has been. Sometimes unintentionally.

All this makes for a good argument to learn how to use an old-fashionedย compass and read a map. Continue reading

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