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The Man in the Arena

Theodore Roosevelt

Theodore Roosevelt

It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.

Theodore Roosevelt, former President of the United States, gave a speech entitled Citizenship in a Republic, at the Sorbonne in Paris, France, on April 23, 1910.  This notable passage is often referred to as The Man in the Arena.

The full speech at the Theodore Roosevelt Center »

New forensic analysis indicates bones found on a remote island in the South Pacific were likely those of legendary adventurer Amelia Earhart

Science Daily:

Richard Jantz, professor emeritus of anthropology and director emeritus of UT’s Forensic Anthropology Center, re-examined seven bone measurements conducted in 1940 by physician D. W. Hoodless. Hoodless had concluded that the bones belonged to a man.

Jantz, using several modern quantitative techniques — including Fordisc, a computer program for estimating sex, ancestry, and stature from skeletal measurements — found that Hoodless had incorrectly determined the sex of the remains. The program, co-created by Jantz, is used by nearly every board-certified forensic anthropologist in the US and around the world.

The data revealed that the bones have more similarity to Earhart than to 99 percent of individuals in a large reference sample.

The new study is published in the journal Forensic Anthropology.

Source: University of Tennessee at Knoxville

Outdoor recreation has larger economic impact than mining or agriculture

Get your selfie stick out.

Kamila Kudelska, Wyoming Public Media:

The new study by the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Economic Analysis showed that outdoor recreation accounted for two percent of the entire U.S. economy in 2016.

And

Tara Highfill, a research economist at the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, said two percent is actually very significant in the overall economy.

“That may sound small, but it’s actually quite large when you look at other industries,” she said. “For example, outdoor recreation is larger than the entire mining industry in the U.S. It’s larger than the entire agriculture industry in the U.S.”

Highfill said the most surprising finding is the size of the outdoor recreation economy and the speed at which it is growing. In 2016, the outdoor recreation economy grew 3.8 percent, compared to a growth of 2.8 percent in the overall economy. A final report will be released in September.

Study: Outdoor Recreation Satellite Account: Prototype Statistics for 2012-2016

More:
Outdoors Economy Is Bigger Than Oil – GearJunkie
Outdoor recreation was 2 percent of GDP in 2016 – TheHill

Laos is remaking itself as an adventure center, and it’s serving them well

John Henderson, Los Angeles Times:

In 1990, about 14,400 people visited landlocked Laos. By 2015, that number had swollen to 4.7 million. A country the World Bank ranked among the 10 poorest in the world in 1991 is now at 118.

I spent three weeks in February 2017 traversing the country, trekking along the northern border with China and kayaking along the Mekong River on the southern tip near Cambodia.

I started in the middle of the country, going north, then heading south, which seems not to make sense on its face but was faster than traveling north to south or the other way around.

Video: Tales of ice-bound wonderlands

A 2011 TED Talk by adventure photographer Paul Nicklen, just named one of this year’s National Geographic’s Adventures of the Year.

From TED:

Diving under the Antarctic ice to get close to the much-feared leopard seal, photographer Paul Nicklen found an extraordinary new friend. Share his hilarious, passionate stories of the polar wonderlands, illustrated by glorious images of the animals who live on and under the ice.

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