🌐 Travel + Adventure

Category: Backpacking / Hiking / Trekking / Camping (Page 1 of 3)

11 young women canoeing for 6 weeks through a wilderness of streams, lakes, rivers, mud holes, and muskeg bogs of northern Quebec

Hannah Maia » The Guardian »

This is an epic adventure, 40 days in the northern reaches of Quebec, travelling with traditional tools including wood-canvas canoes and fire irons for cooking over an open fire. It is a trip filled with unknowns for me, but there is one thing of which I’m sure: the 11 young women I’m travelling with, nine of whom are teenagers, will not see each other at their best. They are bug-bitten, cold and boob-deep in muskeg bog and have to carry an incredibly heavy canoe on their heads.

At the heart of this story is a summer camp – but not the kind most people know. This one is called Keewaydin, the second-oldest operating summer camp in North America. Its vision hasn’t changed since it was established in 1893: “a program focused on wilderness canoe tripping, with minimum time spent in base camp”. In its first 105 years only boys got the chance to go tripping, but in the past two decades girls have joined the ranks. I’m interested in how something established more than a century ago to promote manliness and “roughing it in the woods” can be relevant for teenage girls today. I wonder what kind of teenage girl would want to forgo life’s luxuries to spend a summer in the wilderness – but also know that, as a teenager, I probably would have been one of them.

Continue reading

One young man, walking around the world, with his dog

From Great Big Story on YouTube »

Who better to see the world with than your best friend? Especially when your best friend is a dog. Tom Turcich of New Jersey and his adorable pooch Savannah have walked over 18,000 miles through the United States, Mexico, Costa Rica, Chile, Italy, Turkey and dozens of other countries over the past five years. It’s been a life-changing adventure. They’ve survived hardship, and they’ve experienced the kindness of strangers along the way. And they’ve still got miles to go.

Arthur C. Brooks walked across Spain. Here’s what he found.

Arthur C. Brooks, writing in the Washington Post »

But the pilgrims still come, in larger and larger numbers. If not explicitly the divine, what are they seeking? There are definite worldly benefits to pilgrimage. Almost everyone loses weight, for example (although not like I did — starting my Camino on the heels of a bout of stomach flu and thus in a radically fasted state, I lost 10 pounds in a week). Some treat it like a physical-endurance challenge, such as the shredded and tanned couple we met in Santiago de Compostela who had completed the entire 500-mile walk, starting in France, in just 24 days.

Some seek relief from emotional torment, and there is evidence they can find it: A study published in the journal Psychological Medicine reported that those who went on a pilgrimage to Lourdes, France, (another major Catholic pilgrimage destination) experienced a significant decrease in anxiety and depression, sustained for at least 10 months after the pilgrims had returned.

Video: How to camp in the winter without dying

From Outside magazine via YouTube »

You’ve learned how to find good firewood in challenging conditions and then use it to reliably get a fire going no matter what. You’ve learned how to layer for the outdoors. You’ve learned how to read a map. What’s the logical conclusion of learning all this and the other skills we’ve covered in this video series? The ability to experience new, riskier environments with confidence and comfort. With the right approach and gear, winter camping can be just as comfortable as camping any other time of year. Here’s how.

One Man’s Epic Six-Month Adventure Across the Pacific Crest Trail

James Gabriel Martin writing in Lonely Plant:

The Pacific Crest Trail is a remarkable 2650-mile walking route from Mexico to Canada that passes through California, Oregon and Washington. A National Scenic Trail, it includes stunning deserts, shady woodlands, volcanic peaks and breath-taking views of the glaciated tips of the Sierra Nevada. The sheer size of the trail means that some hikers only do a portion of it, while others choose to take it in sections according to the season. Photographer and creative director Tim Voors decided to undertake the whole thing at once, documenting the exciting journey in a new book that has just been published.

And

“I was inspired by the thought of being totally alone. At 43 years-old I had rarely been by myself for longer than 12 or 24 hours. There’s simply always people around, be it family, colleagues or friends. It took quite some time to get used to sleeping totally alone under the stars without a soul around for miles. Of course I met lots of people, which was fun and inspirational, but for the most part I hiked alone during the day for six months from Mexico to Canada,” Tim told Lonely Planet Travel News.

Read More…

A guide to backpacking stoves

Something that I had to consider for my upcoming adventures is availability of fuel. I chose a multi-fuel stove over an alcohol or propane/butane stove as they offer me more flexibility.

In some areas of the world, denatured alcohol and ethanol are not available, at least not legally. And when you are in a foreign country, the last thing you want to do is disrespect the rules and regulations of that country.

The same thing applies to propane and butane. You might find yourself someplace that doesn’t have your brand of butane canister. Plus I’m not crazy about carrying around pressurized fuels in non-refillable canisters that I’ll have to dump into a landfill.

« Older posts

© 2020 Adventure Trend

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑